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Choose the news 5/17/18

The Key to True Happiness Is . . . Turning Off Your Phone at 10:00 P.M.

  Scientists just found the KEY to happiness.  And even though it’s just one tiny, simple thing you could do to instantly improve your life . . . you’re still going to think it’s too much to ask.

Researchers in Scotland found that the secret to true happiness is . . . turning off your phone at 10:00 P.M.  That’s it.

They found that when you use your phone later than that, it messes with your body’s rhythms . . . and your head.

People who use their phones late at night and right before bed were much more likely to have all sorts of problems . . . including loneliness, depression, and sleep issues.

So by cutting yourself off at 10:00 P.M., it gives you time to wind down without all of the chaos from social media . . . and it stops blasting you with the blue light from your phone that can confuse your body and keep you from falling asleep.

 

The “Yanny” or “Laurel” Debate Was Started by a High School Freshman Who Got the Audio Off Vocabulary.com

There’s been a heated debate the last couple days over an audio clip of a SINGLE WORD.  Some people think the voice is saying “laurel,” and other people hear it as “yanny.”

Now we have some context on how the whole thing got started . . . and a definitive answer on which one is correct.

It turns out a high school freshman in Georgia named Katie Hetzel got the debate going last Friday while she was studying for a literature class.  One of the vocabulary words she needed to look up was “laurel.”

So she looked up the definition on the website Vocabulary.com . . . played a clip of how to pronounce it . . . and THAT’S where the audio came from.

So if “laurel” is what you hear, you’re technically correct.

Katie DIDN’T hear “laurel” though, she heard “yanny.”  Then she played it for some of her classmates, and they couldn’t agree.

So she posted it on Instagram . . . other people started re-posting it . . . and that’s how it all got started.

A lot of people assumed it was a computer voice.  But it’s actually the voice of an OPERA singer that Vocabulary.com hired back in 2007 to pronounce a bunch of words for them.  He was also in the original Broadway production of “Cats”.

In case you haven’t heard the explanation yet, here you go . . .

The reason some people hear “yanny” instead of “laurel” has to do with how the audio was recorded . . . how your speakers play it back . . . what you’re EXPECTING to hear . . . and which frequencies your brain zeroes in on.

Younger people tend to hear higher frequencies better than older people do.  So young people are more likely to hear it as “yanny” instead of “laurel.”

 

A Woman Used Her Boyfriend’s Full Name in Her Graffiti Love Messages

 

I’ll never get why people think spray-painting someone’s name on public property proves their love.  How is graffiti romantic?  But this takes it to a whole new level of dumb . . .

Earlier this week, a 28-year-old woman named Brittany Ann Clenney took a can of purple spray paint to a new park that recently opened in Santa Rosa Beach, Florida.  (About 70 miles east of Pensacola.)

And she caused $10,000 in damages by covering the place in love messages for her boyfriend, John.

She spray-painted stuff on the side of a wooden dock that was just installed . . . on some big rocks next to it . . . on the side of a wall . . . and on a giant column for a huge overhead bridge.

But unfortunately for Brittany, the cops were easily able to figure out who did it . . . because she used John’s FULL NAME in one of the messages.

It said, quote, “John Ryan Wilson, you stole my heart.  And I love it.”  Then one of her other messages was signed “Brittany Ann.”

The cops tracked her down on Tuesday, and she still had purple paint on one of her arms.  She’s facing a felony charge for criminal mischief.

 



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